Temporary Relief From Sinus Pressure

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I came down with a sinus infection and bronchitis this past Thursday and felt awful all weekend; never fails during this time of the year. Anyway, I had some serious sinus pressure that about killed me, figuratively speaking. I very rarely take prescription or over-the-counter medication, other than my inhaler as needed, and had absolutely no interest in popping anti-inflammatories this time around.

So, how did I temporarily relieve myself from killer sinus pressure? Well, by using Olbas Aromatherapy Massage Oil and Inhalant.

© Olbas Herbal Remedies.

This stuff is GREAT, and it has more uses than one! A lot of my clients like me to rub this in areas that have been bothersome prior to their session; I’ve put some on a tissue and hung it from the face cradle when clients get “stuffy” in the prone position (on their stomach); and, in my case, I literally rubbed some underneath and slightly inside my nostrils… Hahaha! (The bottle warning states that this is for “external use only” so this post in no way, shape, or form means that it’s safe to put inside the nostrils… I’m only giving my experience… And so far, nothing bad has happened from doing so.)

Needless to say, my sinus pressure went away in less than two minutes; however, keep in mind that I had to reapply a few times throughout the day because it was only temporary, but to me, that beats taking medicine I don’t feel comfortable with.

In case you were wondering about the ingredients, it is made in Switzerland using the following essential oils…

Hooray for temporary relief from sinus pressure thanks to Olbas Aromatherapy Massage Oil and Inhalant. 🙂

As always, I hope you find this information informative!

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“Neutral balance alignment is key to becoming pain-free” ~ Me

If you like this post, please share with others by using the social media links below. Feel free to check out my website as well, and thanks in advance for your continued support!

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Celebrating AMTA’s National Massage Therapy Awareness Week

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October 21-27 is American Massage Therapy Association’s (AMTA) 16th annual National Massage Therapy Awareness Week (NMTAW).

What is NMTAW?

National Massage Therapy Awareness Week was created by AMTA to raise public awareness of the benefits of therapeutic massage, attract media attention to nationwide activities being carried out by AMTA chapters, professional members, students and schools as an opportunity to demonstrate their professionalism and skill. It is an excellent opportunity for AMTA members across the country to share the importance of consumers choosing AMTA members because they are highly qualified professionals who contribute to the heath and well-being of the public through massage.

Here are a few links to documents that the AMTA has put together for consumer awareness…
AMTA Consumer Fact Sheet
Living Right: Talking to Your Physician about Massage
Massage Therapy Research Roundup

As a consumer, you can also subscribe to AMTA’s “e-touch” Consumer E-Newsletter to keep on top of the latest trends in massage, for health and wellness tips, and massage in your community!

As a therapist, click this link to see what benefits you get with membership. Because I wasn’t aware of this while in massage school, I wanted to also let you know that membership is open to students as well.

As always, I hope you find this information informative!

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“Neutral balance alignment is key to becoming pain-free” ~ Me

If you like this post, please share with others by using the social media links below. Feel free to check out my website as well, and thanks in advance for your continued support!

What About Massage Interests You?

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Keeping up with a blog—posting at least once a week was my goal—is sometimes difficult for yours truly. There are so many things I could write about with regards to massage, but picking and choosing what I think may interest you is more of a challenge than I originally thought it would be.

I was recently told by a long-term client that she believes I have some perfectionist tendencies. Hahaha… I think I just proved her correct. 😉

Anyway, I will continue to go-with-my-flow by writing about what interests me, but please tell me what about massage interests you by taking a few seconds to complete my poll; your opinion matters!

UPDATE AS OF 10/11/12: I moved the poll to my blog’s sidebar. 🙂

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“Neutral balance alignment is key to becoming pain-free” ~ Me

If you like this post, please share with others by using the social media links below. Feel free to check out my website as well, and thanks in advance for your continued support!

Did You Know…

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That Ohio was the first state to license the practice of massage, and the first applicant was licensed in 1916? In fact, according to the State Medical Board, Ohio is also unique in that it defines massage therapy as a “limited branch of the practice of medicine.”

© Nicole K. Ftacnik, LMT, CPNMT

For an interesting article on the history of massage licensure, please read Massage Therapy Licensing: An In-Depth Look.

This career is no longer bound by myths such as “work of the Devil” or “prostitution”, this career is a legitimate career with legitimate therapists who are proud of their work and that fully support the regulation of their career.

I’m all about rules and regulations when it comes to helping the public via therapeutic touch, and am very interested to see how the massage therapy field continues to change as we move forward in time.

As always, I hope you find this information informative!

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“Neutral balance alignment is key to becoming pain-free” ~ Me

If you like this post, please share with others by using the social media links below. Feel free to check out my website as well, and thanks in advance for your continued support!

More On Myofascial Trigger Points (TrP’s)

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Back in May of this year, I posted an article titled Trigger Points (TrP’s) In Detail and thought I would take it a step further by describing additional TrP’s that I learned about via the Precision Neural Mobilization seminar I attended. Before I list them however, please allow me to give you some other details.

1) TrP’s may be caused by several factors, including acute or chronic muscle overload, activation by other TrP’s, disease, psychological distress, homeostatic imbalances, direct trauma to the region, accident trauma, radiculopathy, and infections/health issues.

2) TrP’s form only in muscles—as a local contraction in a small number of muscle fibers located within in a larger muscle or muscle bundle. They can pull on tendons and ligaments associated with the muscle, which in turn, can cause pain deep within a joint where there are no muscles. They can also cause muscle weakness.

3) TrP referral patterns follow specific nerve pathways and have been readily mapped—thanks to Travell & Simons—to aid in the identification of pain. Many TrP’s have pain patterns that overlap, and some create reciprocal cyclic relationships.

4) A taut band in muscles containing TrP’s can feel like hard nodules. Upon palpation, a twitch response can often be felt; activateing the “all or nothing” response in a muscle that causes it to contract. Pressing on an affected muscle can often refer pain, and clusters of TrP’s are not uncommon in some in larger muscles (i.e. the gluteus group).

As promised, here is a list of TrP’s above and beyond what I gave you the last time; the first three being what was listed in my previous post…

  • Active – A TrP that causes a clinical pain complaint. It is always tender; prevents full lengthening of a muscle; weakens a muscle; activates a local twitch response when stimulated; direct compression refers patient-recognized pain that is generally in it’s pain reference zone. (Click here for a website that lists reference zones and pain referral patterns.)
  • Latent – A TrP that is clinically inactive with respect to spontaneous pain; painful only when palpated. It may have all other characteristics of an active TrP and always has a taut band that increases muscle tension and restricts range of motion (ROM).
  • Satellite – A TrP that is influenced neurogenically or mechanically by the activity of a key TrP.
  • Associated – A TrP in one muscle that develops in response to compensatory overload, a shortened position, or referred phenomena cause by TrP activity in another muscle. Satellite and secondary TrP’s are types of associated TrP’s.
  • Attachement – A TrP at the musculotendinous junction and/or at the osseous attachment of a muscle that identifies the enthesopathy caused by unrelieved tension, characteristic of the taut band that is produced by a central TrP.
  • Central – A TrP that is closely associated with dysfunctional end-plates and is located near the center of muscle fibers.
  • Key – A TrP responsible for activating one or more TrP’s.
  • Primary – A central TrP that is activated by acute or chronic overload, or repetitive overuse of a muscle in which it occurs, and was not activated as a result of TrP activity in another muscle.

The misdiagnosis of pain is the most important issue taken up by Travell and Simons. Referred pain from trigger points mimics the symptoms of a very long list of common maladies, but physicians, in weighing all the possible causes for a given condition, rarely consider a myofascial source. The study of trigger points has not historically been part of medical education. Travell and Simons hold that most of the common everyday pain is caused by myofascial trigger points and that ignorance of that basic concept could inevitably lead to false diagnoses and the ultimate failure to deal effectively with pain.

The above quote comes from a workbook titled The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook. With this book, you will learn about TrP’s and how to treat them; however, it is important for you to keep in mind that if your muscular-skeletal system is misaligned, other muscles are affected, which in my opinion, makes it hard to self-treat in a way that is more than just temporary. Every little bit helps though!

As always, I hope you find this information informative!

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“Neutral balance alignment is key to becoming pain-free” ~ Me

If you like this post, please share with others by using the social media links below. Feel free to check out my website as well, and thanks in advance for your continued support!